Olli Dürr Society A meaningful fasting project? Colorful Babylon mix

A meaningful fasting project? Colorful Babylon mix

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During the fasting period, you can have unusual thoughts due to a temporary change in diet. However, when it comes to the Catholic Church, such exceptional states tend to be chronic.

A meaningful fasting project (?)

Lent

During Fasting it can sometimes be less

Lent, which is traditionally cultivated by the churches, appears as a further reason to start another tense arc on the subject of climate protection and nature conservation. Time to think about the environment and animals, as well as human overexploitation. In his contribution, Dominik Blum, pastoral coordinator in the Catholic parish community Artland in the diocese of Osnabrück, draws on the new Misereor hunger cloth by the Freiburg-based artist Emeka Udemba in order to show the prevailing grievances between humans and animals. The starvation cloth shows a blue-green planet falling into the “red, overheated universe”. From this (still) image of the famine, Blum recognizes a rapidly moving globe “between the beginning and the abyss”. Words can also be found from the collage, which also contain “human and animal”.

Man – supposed crown of creation

According to Blum, man as the “supposed crown of creation” rules over his fellow creatures within the framework of use and exploitation, as well as superiority and subordination. From this, humans maintain their “very own speciesism”. This is the reason for the worldwide extinction of species, according to the summary of the head of various new projects of the diocese. The relationship between humans and “non-human animals” has long ceased to be sacred. According to this, more than 70 percent of the stocks of vertebrates have declined in the past half century. Up to 150 animal and plant species are currently on the brink of extinction every day. The global rate of extinction is currently 1,000 times that of “evolutionary” extinctions. No “serious expert” doubts that the causes can be found in hunting, poaching, intensive agriculture, pesticides, overexploitation and climate change.

A “meaningful fasting project”

The pastoral coordinator recommends a change in behavior in everyday life as a new “meaningful fasting project” for the measures that are now very much recommended during Lent. For example, people in the “Know” category should go to the zoo instead of the shopping mall, feed the birds instead of the stock fund, and watch an animal documentary instead of a sitcom.
In the “Love” section, it would make sense to read the creation account. It shows that people and animals were only “very good” together. Blum sees the well-known philosopher Albert Schweitzer as a role model for people’s attitudes towards life. Understand yourself with him “as life that wants to live – in the midst of life that wants to live”. Meat can still be eaten on Sundays, but only from good husbandry with an animal welfare label, said Blum, with the admonishing final words that this should really only be enjoyed on Sundays.

A motley mix

A Pastoral Coordinator is not automatically a theologian. However, the Bible, which Blum even recommends at least for the area of ​​the creation account, is understandable for everyone. At this point, it would be interesting to know how to deal with what has been read.

What now? Bible or Theory of Evolution?

The creation account of the Bible clashes strongly with the assumption of an “evolution-related extinction”. Evolution and the account of creation are diametrically opposed. So enjoy the Bible only as pure distraction and entertainment? That the theory of evolution has already been completely refuted on the basis of scientific arguments should only be mentioned if you don’t value being taken seriously. From whom actually? This manslaughter argument from “serious experts” is already so worn out that it’s boring again.

Bible predicts decay

study the Bible

Bible study (without catechism) recommended

The creation was only “very good” with humans and animals together, so the tenor. Nevertheless, humans are allowed to eat the animal, if only on Sundays. Why exactly Sunday? Is it the Catholic? Church itself, which defined Sunday as “Lord’s Day”. In the understanding of the catechism, does one honor the Lord by eating the co-creation on Sunday? In fact, however, the strong reduction, or even better the renunciation of meat, would also be a great advantage for the “eater”.

It is understandable that a “genuine” Catholic does not have too much to do with the Holy Scriptures. The arrogance of this church also includes the self-determined higher authority of the catechism over God’s word (Bible). The Bible should only be interpreted based on tradition. It’s a shame, otherwise even a coordinator who studies the Bible independently would find out that a disintegration of God’s creation has been predicted. An example is Isaiah 51:6:
“Lift up your eyes to the heavens, and look upon the earth beneath: for the heavens shall vanish away like smoke, and the earth shall wax old like a garment, and they that dwell therein shall die in like manner: but my salvation shall be for ever, and my righteousness shall not be abolished.”

The purest confusion

The “meaningful fasting project” is just a symptom of the united human family being pushed by the Catholic Church in the common “fight against climate change” and “protecting mother earth”. Their philosophies, humanities and biblical statements are motley mixed up. That is exactly what defines Babylon. The confusion. Nothing more reasonable can be expected from the Church in relation to the unadulterated Word of God. Clear announcement in Revelation 14:8:
“And there followed another angel, saying, Babylon is fallen, is fallen, that great city, because she made all nations drink of the wine of the wrath of her fornication.”

Shoemaker, stick to your last and Christian, stick to the Scriptures and nothing else.

Bible verses from King James Version

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